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"The Money-Maker, above all else, is the originator and innovator. The trait most signally absent from his character is resignation, the passive acceptance of the given, the known, the established, the status quo."[1]  She writes "... wealth is the product of man's intellect, of his creative ability, fully as much as is art, science, philosophy or any other human value."[2]  She goes on to state that "the essential characteristic of the Money-Maker is his independent judgment". "A man of independent judgment is a man of profound self-esteem: he trusts the competence of his own mind to deal with the problems of existence. He looks at the world, wondering: 'What can be done?' or 'How can things be improved?' "The money maker is" committed to a maximum of effort; he learns everything he can about the business, much more than his job requires." He is "committed to his work with the passion of a lover, the fire of a crusader, the dedication of a saint and the endurance of a martyr. As a rule, his creased forehead and his balance sheets are the only evidence of it he can allow the world to see."[3] "To a Money-Maker, as well as to an artist, work is not a painful duty or a necessary evil, but a way of life; to him, productive activity is the essence, the meaning and the enjoyment of existence; it is the state of being alive."[4]  Perhaps one of the greatest examples of this approach to life was provided by Arthur Davis who created Alcoa. After amassing a fortune of about 350 million dollars, and at the age of 89, he moved to Florida and started a completely new venture. He managed real estate developments, and airlines and hotels, and banks and farms, which became more and more successful. Here was a man whose love of productivity thrilled him until the end of his life.

The Money-Maker can act on his independent judgment even in the midst of intense pressure to conform, when the whole world seems to predict his failure. Such a man was Henry Ford, who invented the assembly line, and was the first to offer his workers above-market wages in order to attract the most talented job-seekers and retain the best employees. Another was Edwin Land whose idea of an instant camera was scorned by camera dealers across the country, but who went on to invent and develop the camera nonetheless.


Footnotes:

[1] Ayn Rand “The Money Making Personality” in Richard Ralston(ed), Why Businessmen Need Philosophy (The Ayn Rand Institute 1999) p. 30

[2] Ayn Rand “The Money Making Personality” in Richard Ralston(ed), Why Businessmen Need Philosophy (The Ayn Rand Institute 1999) p. 29

[3] Ayn Rand “The Money Making Personality” in Richard Ralston(ed), Why Businessmen Need Philosophy (The Ayn Rand Institute 1999) p. 30

[4] Ayn Rand “The Money Making Personality” in Richard Ralston(ed), Why Businessmen Need Philosophy (The Ayn Rand Institute 1999) p. 32

 

 
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